Apr 13 • 35M

What actually is brain fog?

In today's episode, we explore the science behind brain fog, all the fascinatingly different ways it can impact us, and what can be done to help.

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Natasha Lipman
Welcome to The Rest Room: a place to explore what it means to live (and live well) with chronic illness.
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Like many people living with chronic illness and chronic pain, brain fog is a normal (but bloody annoying) part of my daily life. Whilst I can talk about it subjectively, I never spent much time thinking about what brain fog actually is.

I’m not particularly adept at using visual and descriptive imagery to explain things, so I loved when my friend said that brain fog to her is “like trying to load Netflix on dial up internet on a windows 98 computer.”

In today’s episode, I’m joined by Dr Sabina Brennan, a neuroscientist, health psychologist, and author of the book Beating Brain Fog, who also lives with brain fog herself.

Sabina shares some of the fascinating science behind what brain fog is, why people experience brain fog, and all the different ways brain fog can impact us. We’ll also explore what we can do to help.

This episode was made possible thanks to my Premium subscribers. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.

Turns out, it’s a lot more interesting and complex than I thought, and I now understand some of my own symptoms (and how I interact with the world) better than I did before.

So, if you struggle with brain fog (whatever that means to you), I think you’ll learn a lot from this episode. I certainly did!


To listen, you can just click play at the top of this email, or you can listen on Apple, Spotify, Amazon and Google. If you’d rather read the transcript of the episode, I’ve made that available on my blog.


To learn about pacing more with chronic illness, check out this episode of The Rest Room Podcast. 

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Catch up on my latest issue about growing up in a body that seemingly falls apart at random, and my multi-year quest to learn to feel safer in my body and movement.

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